A Tale to Tell: A Cherie Priest Tribute

Just a few months ago I re-published my article, “Creating Social Change One Person at a Time,” in which I talked about how the impact you have on individual people around you can, in itself, be a form of social activism. Denny Upkins is back to demonstrate exactly how this phenomenon can happen and the ripple effect it can create.  CN: general discussion of racism and homophobia An author by the name of J.D. Stroube …Read More

New Merch: LGBTQ Pride Dice Pattern

Happy Pride! A goal we made for ourselves for the summer was to get into pattern design and start uploading them to Spoonflower (another Print on Demand site that specializes in fabric & wallpaper). I asked a friend if there were any patterns she wished existed that she hadn’t seen before and she said, D&D Dice! I had a lot of fun drawing the dice and quickly realized this would be perfect design to adapt …Read More

New Merch: “Not Just a Phase” Bisexuality Pride

For a while now, I’ve been meaning to make some merch using different pride flag colors. It seemed fitting for the first design to be the bisexual pride flag colors, blue, purple, and pink, since I’m bisexual and the friend who requested this design is also bisexual. I made a version with the words “Not Just a Phase” to honor the specific scrutiny bisexual folks face about their sexuality, but I also made a version …Read More

Signed, the Daughter You May Someday Know

CN: graphic description of self-harm; discussion of suicide, teen homelessness, homophobia, religious opposition to homosexuality, familial rejection, and mental illness. Every openly LGBTQ+ person has a coming-out story. I grew up in an incredibly liberal town where bisexuality or any kind of sexual fluidity was common enough that I encountered very little resistance when I came out, which is why I haven’t written much about my own experience regarding sexual orientation on this blog. The …Read More

Who Is Marginalized?

CN: Mention of serious effects of oppression, specific to race, sexual orientation, gender, gender identity, physical and mental ability, class and religion. There are a number of traits for which people are oppressed, and these traits fall into a number of categories. A crucial idea in understanding the premise of social justice is that for each category, there is a group that our society currently considers “default,” “normal,” or “neutral” and anyone outside of that …Read More